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IHM: Issaquah Press Collection
Issaquah, WA
January 18, 1940     IHM: Issaquah Press Collection
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January 18, 1940
 

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PAGE FOUR THE ISSAQUAH PREISS, ISSNQUAH, KING CO., WASHINGTON Classified Advertising FOR SALE buffet, tables, chairs, cots, Vanity Ideal hot water heater, roofing paper, patent shingles, platform scales, some tools, pumps and nu- merous other articles. Morey’s Auction House, Saturday, Jan. 20. 1 o’clock. 1 mile east of Redmond. Telephone, Dial 636. FOR SALE—Alfalfa hay, first cutting, 1 bale or 100. Reeve’s Auto Camp, half—way between Preston and Fall City. WILL TRADE——-1928 Pontiac with saw rig, and a trailer, for ‘31 Ford or ‘32 Chev. Inquire at Coalfield Gas Station for O. H. Arms. WHITNEY, the Rose Man—ls giving free, your choice of two New roses to introduce them, with rose orders this month. They are worth while varieties. Whitney Nurseries. FOR SALE—Young Rhode ls~ land laying hens, $1 each. Mrs. John Kramer. F O R S A L E Barred-Rocks hatching eggs. Clyde Darst. FOR SALE—New Hampshire hatching eggs and chicks‘. Charlie Tucker, Rt. A, Issaquah. FOR SALE—Will sacrifice for quick sale 1 Majestic cabinet ra- dio. This office. FOR SALE—Cold Spot refrig- erator, 6 cubic feet, $50. Thor washer and ironer, $25. 7-foot trailer, 16 inch wheels, $20. New Home sewing machine, $5. C. W. Barnett, on C. L. Olsen place. FOR SALE—My equity in 21/4: acres just south of city limits, ad— joining Wm. Cornick’s on Issa- qufah-Hobart road. Write A. C. Banfiill, Port Stanley, Wash. FOR SALE—Man’s brown suit, size 38, good as‘new. $10.00. Thurston’s. POULTRYMEN ATTENTION: You need GOOD baby chicks to get good checks later. Order Co— op Chicks today and be sure of the best. Leghorns, Reds, Rocks. Low prices, free delivery. Wash. Co-op. Chick Association, Kent, Wash. Phone 94. STAGE SCHEDULE: _ (Efliective Until January 25) WEEK-DAY SCHEDULE Leave lssaqu'ah— 7:25 a.m. 3:40 p.m. 11:35 a.m. 5:50 p.m. Leave Seattle—— 7:15 a.m. 11:15 a.m. 2:15 p.m. 5:15 p.m. 8:00 p.m. SUNDAY and HOLIDAY SCHEDULE Leave lssaquah— 11:30 a.m. 5:50 p.m. 3:40‘p.m. 8:15 p.m. Leave Seattle— 8:00 a.m. 5:15 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 10:00 p.m. NORTH BEND STAGE IIIIIIIIIIIEIIIIIIEIII GOLF Sunday: 5nd Holidays All Day ............................. .. Redmond 75° All Day ................. After 5 o'clock...25c IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII FOR SALE—Good saddle horse and saddle; ranges, cook stove, cream separators, sewing machine FOR RENT FOR RENT—The C. L. Olson Farm, equipped for poultry rais- ing or dairying. See Mrs. thtie Olson. FOR RENT—~Modern cabins. Park Inn, Issaquah. WANTED WANTED—Small cream sep- arator. Phone Issaquah 50-J-2. MISCELLANEOUS List Your Property With VINCENT D. MILLER, INC. Renton Ofiice, Renton Wash. AUCTION every Saturday at 1 o’clock at Morey’s Auction House. Bring what you have to sell—buy what you want. Phone Dial 686. 1 mile east of Redmond. TWO Good Numbers—P. O. Box 22—Phone 223. Valley Radio Service, Fall City, Wash. Guaran- teed work on all makes of radio. Genuine factory replacement of parts. Reasonable charges, prompt service. FOR GOOD reliable fire insur— ince, insure in the Farmers’ Mu— tual Fire Insurance Co. of Enum- claw, the oldest, cheapest and saf- est. For prices and information, call or write Roy Beery, Rt. 3, Box 73, Kent, Washington. DRESS SHIRTS look better when laundered by us——20c per— satisfaction guaranteed. Consoli- dated Laundry. Phone 43-W, Issa- quah, Washington. FRATERNAL ORDERS GILMAN REBEKAH LODGE No. 59, I. O. O. F. Meets first and third Wednesday each month at I. O. 0. F. Hall. Loretta Lewis, N.G.; Ethel Layne, Secretary. CENTURY CHAPTER No. 66, 0. ES. Meets second and fourth Wednesday in Masonic Hall. Meta Mitchell, W. M., Olive Bayh, Secy. MYRTLE LODGE No. 108, F. & A.M. Meets first Saturday each month. J. Lael Simmons, W. M.; Thos. F. Drylie, Secretary. ISSAQUAH AERIE No. 1813, Fraternal Order of Eagles. Meets at Union Hall the first Saturday and third Thursday at 8 o’clock. Floyd Erickson, W.P.; D. W. Hume Sr., V.-W.P.;/ S. M. Pell, Sec. Visiting brothers wel- come. ISSAQUAH VALLEY GRANGE No’. 581. Meets second and fourth Monday each /month at 8 p.m., Grange Hall. Tauno Erick- son, Master; Mildred Paulson, Sec. TRIANGLE LODGE No. 46. Knights of Pythias. Meets first and third Tuesdays in Odd Fel- low‘Hall. John W. Francis, C.C., Geo. H. Johns, K. R. & S. GILMAN LODGE No. 69, I.0.0.F. Meets every Friday evening at Odd Fellows Hall. Walter Layne, N.G.; Harold Lyne, Secretary. GILMAN ENCAMPMENT No. 43 I.0.0.F. Meets every second Thursday at Issaquah and every fourth Thursday at Redmond. Vis- iting Patriarchs welcome. Harold Lyne, C.P.; E. J. Lindman, Sec. lmmovable Objects Deaths from triotor vehicle col- lisions with fixed objects have in- creased more rapidly than any other type of motor vehicle fatality—244 per cent from 1927 to 1937-—the Unit- ed Stntes bureau of public roads re- ports. 0 Gold in Indiana? Virgil M. Simmons, Indiana's commissioner of conservation. in re- porting to the ,National Wildlife fed: eration on the outdoor attractions of the state, relates that in Brown Dcounty creeks energetic experts are panning gold. A great deal of hard work will yield as much as $1.50 worth of dust in a day. Mf. Sim- mons says. l Thurston Laundry and Cleaning Service Jaclied anal gent/amen! SMALL PAYMENTS on our "reverse" budget plan will enable you to wear our tailored to, order clothes BIG SAVINGS at’ Mon'l Sung. . . All Lodloo’ sum . no." Wool State College Extension Service It is easy to tell by the burning test whether or not a sample of silk is pnredye or weighted. Pure- dye silks burn readily with small blue flame, which is easily put out. The odor is pungent, like burning feathers. The ash is black and shiny, and forms in tiny, brit— tle balls along the edge of the fabric. Weighted silk chars in- stead of burning, and leaves a black ash of the same shape as the peice of cloth. * * A warm and welcome dessert for a cold day is apple pie that has been covered with sliced or grated American cheese and put back into the oven until cheese melts—and then served warm. III * Enamelware should never be scraped with anything sharp oi harsh, as it is likely to chip. It should not be scraped too hard, either, because enamelware is like a thin glass coating over an iron foundation. :- t o The best way to give a rug first aid when something gets spilled is to pour Fuller’s earth, or corn- meal, or some other absorbent powder immediately on top of the spilled liquid. The powder Wiil draw the liquid off the rug. Then the powder can be brushed up. The little stain remaining may be sponged with water or a grease solvent as necessary. 1: o o If a fruit cake is baked in an oblong loaf, the pan should be quite narrow in order to get the cake done in the center without burning the edges. A round pan with a tube in the center is also very satisfactory, since it allows the heat to penetrate evenly. in: o o f Rolled oats usually need about twice as much water Granular cereals, such as corn— meal, will absorb from five to SIX times their measure of water dur- ing cooking, but for whole grain such as rice, it takes about two quarts, or eight times as much water as cereal. i It Weight and warmth don’t nec— essarily go together in blankets. Very often a lightweight, fluffy blanket is warmer than a heavy, fiat blanket. ¥ 1 ¥ A favorite bread for the chil- dren is peanut butter bread. One and one-half cups of peanut but- ter are needed for four loaves of bread, and a little more sugar should be added to the regular bread recipe. ALBERT C. MARTIN Commissioner of Public Lands Notice of Sale of Timber on State Land. Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, the 6th day of Febru- ary; 1940, commencing ,at ten o’clock in the forenoon of said day, in front of the main en- trance door to the county court house in the City of Seattle, County of King, State of Wash- ington, by the County Auditor of said county, the timber on the following described state land will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder therefor, to- wit: Application No. F-182 , (State Forest Board) Timber on Nl/t of NE% of section 28, township 24 north, range 7 east, W.M., containing 80.00 acres, more or less, accord- ing to the government survey thereof, appraised at $2,382.50. According to the State’s cruise there are approximately 25,000 feet yellow fir; 2,000 feet down yellow fir; 1,251,000 feet sapling fir; 2,000 feet down sapling fir; 1,000 feet cedar; 1,000 feet dead standing cedar; 5,000 feet hem- lock and 2,085 lineal feet of ce- dar poles. The purchaser of the above_de— scribed timber willlbe required to comply strictly With laws gov- erning slash disposal as found in Title 36, Chapter 1, Remington’s Compiled Statutes and laws amendatory thereto. The purchasers of state timber are required to run out the lines and are responsible for trespass incase timber is cut on adjacent state-owned property. _ Said timber on, said land Will be sold for not less than the ap- praised value, as appraised by the Commissioner of Public Lands in the manner provided by law, a .statement of which is now_on‘ file in the oflice of the Auditor of said county. . Termsof sale are: Cash to be paid on the, day of sale. The purchaser of timber on ' state lands will have 5 years With. in. which to remove said timber, With. the prmlege of securing ex- tensions of time under the stat- utes governing. ALBERT c. MARTIN commis- sioner of Public Lands and Secretary of the State Forest Board (Seal) 1-4 2-1 W CHINESE HERBS Try natural herbs for relief of your suffering & distress. - DR. GIN MON W0 1.016% 2314 Ave. Seattle Cor. Spring ,1 Call or write as cereal; Gardening By HERBERT PRUVEY of W. Arboretum Gardener U. Pruning Evergreen and Deciduous Shrubs Incorrect pruning probably has discouraged as many home gar- deners as has any other difficulty. Often many of the freak flower— ings of plants and shrubs, such as out-of—season blooms and winter production on spring and sum- mer plants, likewise can be traced to incorrect pruning as often as to unusual seasonal conditions. The major factor which deter- mines the time for pruning is whether a shrub flowers in the spring and early summer or in late summer and fall. Shrubs which bloom in the spring and in early summer form their buds in the fall. For example, the Rhod- dodendron forms its buds in July for the following year’s flowers. To cut or prune such shrubs, which also includes Lilacs and Snowballsrin the fall would mean destruction of the following year’s flowers. In pruning, weak and dead wood andtseed pods should be cut away. Growths re- tained should be cut back from one-third to two-thirds, depend- ing upon whether a large quant— ity of medium flowers or limited number of larger blossoms are de- sired. Shrubs which bloom in the late summer and fall can be pruned throughout the winter and spring months. Weak and dead wood and a few of the very old growths are cut to the ground line. There also is a third class of shrubs which requires little or no pruning, other than cutting out a few pieces of the old and dead wood to the ground line. Following are lists of the more common shrubs in the state of Washington and their pruning time, which can serve as guides for all similar shrubs: Prune after flowering: Mexi- can Orange; Japanese Quince; Broom; Pearl Bush; Golden Bells; Witchhazel; Jasmine; Lilac; Wis- teria; Snowball. r Prune in winter and spring: Butterfly Bush; Beautyberry; Red Stemmed Dogwood; Wild Lilac; Bladder Senna; Hydrangea; Ker- ria; Privet; Ocier Yellow Stem; French Honeysuckle; Abelia. Prune little or none: Leucothoe; Azalea; Siberian Pea Tree; Ocean Spray; Mountain Laurel; Oregon Grape; Mock Orange; English Laurel; Portuguese Laurel; (Vi- brunum) Laurus Tinus; Coton- easter; Deutzia. ‘ 0 Measles Epidemic Checked In County Reassuring reports that the spread of measles in King County has been, checked and the number of new cases is decreasing were released yesterday by Dr. Wallace D. Hunt, county health officer. Pacific City and ‘Fall City schools, closed previously as la pre cautionary measure, reopened on Monday. The Thomas grade school located between .Kent and Au- burn, closed Monday but will re- open'ne‘xt Monday, as will the Mercer Island grade school, Dr. Hunt said. Only four new cases were re- ported to the county health office up to 4 p.m. yesterday, compareo with fourteen for all day Monday. Seven new cases were placed in quarantine in Seattle yesterday, making a total of thirty-three iii the city. ' ‘ “‘These figures are by no means alarming,” said Dr. Carroll. ' Issaquah district thus far has been Very fortunate, only one or two cases having come to light here. ‘ " m0.“— CARD OF THANKS We wish to thank our many friends and relatives for their kind sympathy and the beautiful floral offerings in our recent be~ reavementythe loss of our beloved husband and father. Mrs. Ida Tanska, Leonard Tanska, Eino Tanslla. -—-———o-———___ First Person Named Black The first person harried Black in America was John, at Charlestown, Mass. in 1634. GREENWOOD CEMETERY Greenwood Cemetery his single groves as low as $10 to 820, ml care, but some care. ergetuol core gravel, 25 to I . Concrete. markers urnishod 1m with each grave. Votivho' Plot's Inc v Telephone Renton 55 RENTON. WASHINGTON not 12‘ THURSDAY, JAN. 18, 1940‘ REPORT OF CONDITION OF “ISSAQUAH STATE BANK” of lssaquah in the State of Washington, at the» close of business on December 30, 1939. Assets 1. Loans and discounts (including $78.64 overdrafts) $181,197.91? 2. United States Government obligations, direct and 1 guaranteed ................................................................... .. 66,727.75: 3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions .... .. 37,611.47: 4. Other bonds, notes, and debentures ............ .. ' 9,290.66 5. Corporate stocks ....................... _______________________________ _, 3.00. 6. Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, and cash items in process of collection... 127,697.49 7. Bank premises owned $9,201.48, furniture and fix- tui-es $2,504.28 .................................................... __ 11,705,762, 8. Real estate owned other than hank premises .......... .. 2,874.85, 12. TOTAL ASSETS ...................................................... .,$437,108.92' Liabilities 13. Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations .............................................................. "$139,860.64, 14. Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and ; corporations ......... .................................................... _. 202,155.59: 15. Deposits of United States Government (including 3 postal savings) .......................................................... _. 404.21, 16. Deposits of States and political subdivisions __________ _. 41,996.27; 18. Other deposits (certified and officers’ checks, etc). 3,205.40! 19. TOTAL DEPOSITS .. . $387,622.11 23. Other liabilities ............................................... .; ....... .. 2,009.07: 24. TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated fl obligations shown below) ........................................ ..$389,631.18L Capital Accounts ._ 25. Capital Common stock, total par $25,000.00 .......... ..$ 25,000.00: 26. Surplus ........................................................... .. 5,000.00! 27. Undivided profits ...................................................... .. 17,477.74- 29. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS .............................. .. 47,477.74 30. TOTAL LIABILITIES and CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $437,108.92: Memoranda 31. Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value): (a) U.S. Government obligations, direct and guar- anteed, pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities ............................................................ .. 32,927.78 (b) Other assets pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities (including notes and bills re- discounted and securities sold under repurchase agreement) ........................................................ .. 2,989.21 . (6) TOTAL .............................................................. ..$ 35,916.99 32. Secured and preferred liabilities: (a) Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant to ' requirements of law .......................................... .. 35,512.78‘ (d) Deposits preferred under provisions of law but not secured byupledge-of assets ........................ _. 404.21,, (e) TOTAL .............................................................. ..$ 35,916.99 33. Subordinated obligations: ' (b) Other obligations not included in liabilities which are subordinated to claims of depositors ,- and other creditors .......................................... .. 23,473.23 34. (a) On date of report the required legal reserve against deposits of this bank was ...................... ._ 58,143.32 (b) Assets reported above which were eligible as legal reserve amounted to ................................ .. 127,428.74] I, Paul Wilfong, Cashier, of the above—named bank, do sol—f; emnly swear that the above statement is true, and that it fully and:‘ correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein5 contained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 1 PAUL WILFONG, Cashier. Correct—Attest: \ J. J. LEWIS, C. BEADON HALL, Directors. State of Washington, County of King, ss: Sworn to; and subscribed before me this 10th day of Jan-f uary, 1940, and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director" of this bank. W. E. BILES, Notary Public. My commission expires July 4, 1941. MM iowA CLUB MEETING LEGAL PUBLICATIONS The Iowa Club Will hold its first SIMMONS & MCCANN meeting of the year at 1629 8th 1600 Northern Life Tower Avenue, Seattle, January 23 at Seattle, Washington 8 o’clock. There will be entertain- ‘ ment, cards and refreshments. A1- 50 an important announcment concerning all members. MICKIE SAYS—- of Washington for King County. Madeline Buchanan Merrifield.. Defendant. No. 317755. mons by Publication. Sum- IF \(ou \VERE HIRIH’ Be“ Merr‘field’ defendant: ASALESMAN, YOU'D \VAHT somaeoov 'AT LOOKED IMPORTAHT'N PACKED SOME GOOD OL‘ PRESTIGE AND DIGHi'TvveAME \VAY \VITl-l PRINTED SALES— MAHSI—IIP, 0% A039 menus MOR IMPORTANT IN OLIR NEWSPAPER appear within sixty (60) days af- ter the date of the first publication of this summons, to-wit: within. sixty (60) days after the 28th day of December, 1939, and defend the above entitled action in the above retitled court and answer eline Buchanan Merrifield, and the undersigned attorneys ed, and_ in case of your failure so to do, Judgment will be‘ rendered been filed with the clerk of said from the defendant. for Plaintiff. Office & P.O. Ad- dress: 1600 2927. Hafniurn in Oklahoma Cache. Okla. "WHERE HOSPITALITY CENTERS” Our Coffee Shop and Dlnlns Room Famous for Dollclou: Food LARGE LIGHT ROOMS All with both or shown riszio ‘l'. HAIRY BOWMAN n I I A I s n f \ In the Superior Court of the State Plaintiff, vs. W. Ben Merrifieldr The State of Washington to: W." You Are Hereby Summoned toil the complaint of the paintiff, Mad: ' serve a copy of your answer upfon ,1 or . plaintiff at their office below stat- f against you according to the de‘- mad of the complaint which haS" court. The object of this action I‘ is to secure for plaintiff a divorce 1‘ SIMMONS McCANN, Attorneys 4 Northern Life ,y Tower, Seattle, Wash. Seneca “ 12-28 2-1 . Hafnium, a rare element, never ‘ before known to exist in any min- f erals in this country, has been dil- ‘ covered in the zircon deposits near, \— \m VOLUME 40, The recept players of th 1933118 team, Wanis Club at day night, w: affair. Attendance tions with 16 and is an evf ,feefing towai c0mmunity. prepared for 500“ had ex turkey and a for an excelli With Pres presiding, the the audience America, and banquet, sev were sung i gram. J. R. Steph master was in the j misPlacement master” and ever, Steve ment in a VG Speakers I'Eferee in th ball Confers coach this team. Both Very‘highly, the commun support 91‘ t program the player a swei ISSaquah Vo "lent. co-spo With a COI following th t“in was wri f91' this sea from Hans f: "18 for the t so desire. Hi ed this anm This comi n'loz'row, the the Issaquah (mt time in ' 3 close battli When the BOthell they Ears throug Just a. few if when big Sc and hung u] The India] °ut for hin make every the other 1] The game “31 time, 7: Kirkland Cu With “figl the hard fii fast played quh’itet by l the Issaqus Friday, Jam lResperate the Indians against thei pair of pla Was sent to "‘8- The t00k the lea of Play, nev rest of the